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The Top Ten Questions about Oral Surgery

February 20th, 2019

If you or someone you know is going to require oral surgery, you may have many questions about what exactly will occur during the surgery, what to do (or not do) before and after surgery, and what your options might be. Here, we’ve covered the most common ten questions pertaining to oral surgery.

What is Oral Surgery?

Maxillofacial and oral surgeries is a dental practice consisting of the diagnosis and the surgical treatment of injuries, defects of the mouth, face, jaw and related structures, and of diseases.

Will I be Awake During the Procedure?

It depends on the actual procedure, but many of the more intensive surgeries require that you be anesthetized, or put to sleep for the duration of the procedure. Wisdom tooth removal and dental implant procedures are examples where anesthesia may be required.

What are Dental Implants?

A dental implant is used to replace missing teeth. A titanium fixture is implanted into the jaw if there is sufficient bone to provide anchorage for the implants.

How Long do Implants Last?

With proper care and good hygiene practices, a dental implant can last a lifetime.

Is the Dental Implant Procedure Painful?

Most patients are surprised to find that it was less painful than they expected. Regular Tylenol® is often enough to control the discomfort until it fades after a few days.

What are Wisdom Teeth?

Many people have more teeth than they have room for in their jaw. Wisdom teeth are the "third molars" and they try to erupt into a jaw that is too small when children are in their late teen years.

Why do Wisdom Teeth Need to be Removed?

Today most wisdom teeth end up getting impacted because they have nowhere to go thanks to a mouth full of healthy teeth. When they are not in a normal position they can cause discomfort, pain and even damage to other teeth or nerve endings. Therefore, if your X-rays show that your wisdom teeth are impacted, we may recommend their removal.

Will I Miss Work Due to Oral Surgery?

Taking one day off for the surgery and rest afterward is advised. We'll let you know on a case-by-case basis if more time off is needed, though after most oral surgeries people can go back to work the next day.

Is Exercise a Problem After Oral Surgery?

We usually recommend a week of rest before resuming your exercise regimen. If we think more rest would be better, then we'll let you know.

When Can I Eat After Surgery?

In most cases, you can eat after you get home from the surgery, and soft foods are best.

If you have any specific questions or concerns, we are here to help, and put your mind at ease. Please contact our team at Mid-Hudson Oral and Maxillofacial Practice. We’d love to hear from you!

Common Wisdom Teeth Problems

February 13th, 2019

Have you ever wondered why people have wisdom teeth? These are a third set of molars that come in behind the rest of all your other teeth, usually during early adulthood. Scientists and anthropologists believe that wisdom teeth are a result of evolution, because our ancestors needed these extra teeth to handle their primitive diets. Nowadays, the average diet consists of fewer hard-to-chew foods, which renders wisdom teeth largely superfluous.

Most people begin to experience wisdom teeth pain between the ages of 17 and 25. Our ancestors nicknamed them wisdom teeth because they appeared at a time in life when we supposedly grew wiser.

If you’ve already had your wisdom teeth removed, you know how painful they can become if they aren’t taken care of promptly. If not, watch out for discomfort in the back of your mouth and let Dr. Matthew Hilmi know right away if you think your wisdom teeth are coming in.

In some cases, people do not experience any problems or discomfort with their wisdom teeth. These patients may keep their wisdom teeth intact if there’s enough room in their jaw to fit them properly. But this is generally not the case, so wisdom teeth can cause several concerns, depending on which direction they grow.

Common problems include:

  • Damage to surrounding teeth due to the pressure from the emerging teeth
  • Infection that causes the surrounding gums to swell and become painful
  • Tooth decay due to the lack of room to clean the teeth properly
  • Impaction (when the tooth is unable to break through the skin)
  • A cyst that may damage the jaw, the surrounding teeth, and nerves

If you haven’t had your wisdom teeth removed yet, there are many symptoms to watch out for when they begin to grow. Symptoms may include:

  • Pain or stiffness in the jaw
  • Tooth irritation
  • Swelling of gum tissue
  • Crowding of other teeth
  • Spread of tooth decay or gum disease on nearby teeth

If you’ve noticed these symptoms, schedule an appointment at our office. Don’t forget: This is a common procedure that will take some time to recover from. Allow your mouth to heal, and then you’ll be able to get back to a normal routine quickly and be free from pain!

Recovering from Oral Surgery

February 7th, 2019

If you need oral surgery, Dr. Matthew Hilmi and our team will use our expertise and training to ensure that you have the best possible surgical outcome. And we want to make sure you have the best possible outcome for your recovery as well. Here are a few of the most common aftercare suggestions for making your healing as comfortable and rapid as possible.

  • Reduce Swelling

Ice packs or cold compresses can reduce swelling. We’ll instruct you how to use them if needed, and when to call our office if swelling persists.

  • Reduce Bleeding

Some amount of bleeding is normal after many types of oral surgery. We might give you gauze pads to apply to the area, with instructions on how much pressure to apply and how long to apply it. We will also let you know what to do if the bleeding continues longer than expected.

  • Reduce Pain or Discomfort

If you have some pain after surgery, over-the-counter pain relievers such as ibuprofen might be all that you need. We can recommend those which are best for you. If you need a prescription for pain medication, be sure to take it as directed and always let us know in advance if you have any allergies or other reactions to medications.

  • Recovery-friendly Diet

Take it easy for the first few days after oral surgery. Liquids and soft foods are best for several days following surgery. We will let you know what type of diet is indicated and how long you should follow it depending on your particular procedure. We might, for example, recommend that you avoid alcohol and tobacco, spicy, crunchy, and chewy foods, and hot foods or beverages for several days or several weeks.

  • Take Antibiotics If Needed

If you have been prescribed an antibiotic, be sure to take it as directed. If you have any allergies to antibiotics, let us know in advance.

  • Protect the Wound

Do NOT use straws, smoke, or suck on foods. Avoid spitting.  Part of the healing process can involve the formation of a clot over the surgical site which protects the wound. If the clot is dislodged by suction or spitting, it can prolong your recovery time, or even lead to a potentially serious condition called “dry socket.”

  • Maintain Oral Hygiene

Depending on your surgery, we might recommend that you avoid rinsing your mouth for 24 hours, use salt water rinses when appropriate, and keep away from the surgical site when brushing. It’s important to keep your mouth clean, carefully and gently.

  • Take it Easy!

Rest the day of your surgery and keep your activities light in the days following.

These are general guidelines for recovery. If you have oral surgery scheduled, we will supply you with instructions for your specific procedure, and can tailor your aftercare to fit any individual needs. Our goal is to make sure that both your surgery and your recovery are as comfortable as possible.

Oral Surgeon vs. General Dentist. What's the Difference?

January 30th, 2019

Patients have a variety of options in dental providers, and it can be tricky to know which type of dental professional is best for your current needs. Understanding the differences between general dentists and oral surgeons, like Dr. Matthew Hilmi, can help you make an informed choice for dental care.

Education

Both general dentists and oral surgeons must complete dental school after receiving a bachelor’s degree. In dental school, which typically takes four years of full-time study, students take coursework in anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, pathology, and oral surgery. Dental students also complete clinical practicum experiences, gaining hands-on training in how to diagnose and treat dental problems.

After completing dental school and earning the Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) or Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD) degree, a general dentist must complete a licensure exam to practice in a particular area. In contrast, oral surgeons (often called oral and maxillofacial surgeons) complete a four to six year surgical residency. The residency program must be accepted by the Commission on Dental Accreditation, ensuring that each resident receives the training in oral pathology, anesthesia, oral surgery, and other areas needed to competently practice. Following the surgical residency, a person completes a board certification examination.

Scope of Clinical Practice

General dentists serve as primary care providers for dental medicine. At the general dentist’s office, you will receive teeth cleaning, X-rays, and a comprehensive screening for dental problems. General dentists most often provide gum care, dental fillings, root canals, veneers, bridges, and crowns. They also make recommendations for how to prevent common dental problems. Although a general dentist may perform simple tooth extractions, more complex surgeries may be outside of the scope of a general dentist’s competence.

Oral and maxillofacial surgeons receive specialized training to treat a variety of conditions affecting the face, mouth, and jaw. Patients are typically referred to an oral surgeon when a problem is beyond the scope of a general dentist’s expertise. Oral surgeons perform simple and complex tooth extractions, including wisdom tooth extraction. They also provide care to accident victims who need reconstructive dental surgery. Oral surgeons may also perform soft tissue biopsies, tumor removal, jaw realignment surgery, soft tissue repair, or positioning of implants.

It can be difficult to determine what dental professional best fits your needs. Contact our  office to determine if an oral surgeon can best meet your needs.

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